Cinemark Classic Series for August- October 2013

As the seasons continue to change, the Cinemark Classic Series changes as well. For the Fall 2013 films, Cinemark has mixed things up quite a bit, ranging throughout the genres with action movies, dramas and comedies, not to mention Best Picture nominees, and cult classics- with release years range anywhere from 1958 to 1999. Vertigo (1958)This time around there is a little something for everyone, guaranteed.

As always, you can get more information through the Cinemark website, including ticket prices and showtimes. As usual, each film will be shown once on Sundays at 2:00 P.M., and then twice on the following Wednesday at both 2:00 P.M. and 7:00 P.M. Ticket prices may vary (usually around $10 per movie), but tickets for all six films can be purchased at a reduced, bundled price. (Usually around $30.) Here is the rundown of films being shown:

On Sunday, August 25th, and Wednesday, August 28th:

  • “Pulp Fiction” (1994): Pulp Fiction (1994)Quentin Tarantino surprised the world with this Best Picture nominated film starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson and Bruce Willis. Tarantino won his first Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for his wickedly entertaining combination of humor and violence that not only grabbed attention upon its initial release, but also has become one of the most enduring films of the 1990’s. It also happens to be one of those films that forever changed the way we looked at movies. It is a must see for all cinematic lovers, and there is no better way to see this film than on the big screen. 

On Sunday, September 1st, and Wednesday, September 4th:

  • “The French Connection” (1971):The French Connection (1971) Another dark, gritty film is the crime drama from director William Friedkin. With perfect cinematography, a great screenplay and the best performance of Gene Hackman’s career, “The French Connection” was another game-changer as it swept the movie watching world off their feet, pushing the boundaries of what had been seen in the past. It also happens to be the first “R” rated film to ever receive the Academy Award for Best Picture. 

On Sunday, September 8th, and Wednesday, September 11th:

  • “Some Like It Hot” (1959): Some Like it Hot (1959)Billy Wilder is a comic genius, and this is his masterpiece of humor and delight. Jack Lemmon is incredibly funny, Tony Curtis is at the top of his game, and Marilyn Monroe is as entertaining as ever in this story about two Chicago musicians who are on the run from a mob boss. How will they get out of town unnoticed? Dress up as women and join an all girls band of course! The laughs never stop in what is widely voted one of the funniest films ever made, and a perfect way to spend any day.

On Sunday September 15th, and Wednesday September 18th:

  • “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962): To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)Gregory Peck gives a tour-de-force performance in this incredibly brilliant film based on Harper Lee’s best-selling novel. If you are looking for an example of perfect filmmaking, you need look no further, as each and every aspect of this picture is done to the highest standard. “To Kill a Mockingbird” has proven to the world that with a great story, a brilliantly adapted screenplay, and of course, one of the greatest actors of all time, there is nothing that can’t be accomplished. 

On Sunday, September 22nd, and Wednesday, September 25th:

  • “Fight Club” (1999): Fight Club (1999)You can argue with me day and night if you’d like to, but I said it back on October 15th, 1999, and I still say it today, “Fight Club” is one of the greatest motion pictures ever filmed. Filmmaker extraordinaire David Fincher created one of the most interesting, captivating and completely unorthodox films, that despite the neigh-sayers has hung around long enough to become an incredibly popular cult classic. Edward Norton, Brad Pitt and Helena Bonham Carter are all magnificent, but it is David Fincher’s direction and Jim Uhls’s screenplay that steal the show. 

On Sunday, September 29th, and Wednesday, October 2nd:

  • “Vertigo” (1958): Vertigo (1958)The piece de resistance of this group comes in the form of Alfred Hitchcock’s immortal classic, “Vertigo”. It received many negative reviews upon its initial release, yet somehow in the last 50-some odd years it has moved up the ranks of great films, most recently being voted Sight & Sound magazine’s, “greatest film of all time” in 2012. The always perfect James Stewart stars with Kim Novak in a psychological thriller that is as patient and intriguing as any of Hitchcock’s film, and promises to leave the audience thinking and contemplating long after the lights have come up. Originally filmed in 70mm, “Vertigo” is a film that is begging and pleading to be seen on the largest screen possible, making this an opportunity that shouldn’t be missed.
Advertisements

0 thoughts on “Cinemark Classic Series for August- October 2013

  1. R.A. Kerr says:

    I saw “Vertigo” on the big screen years ago and it was fabulous.

    Until recently, I had zero interest in seeing “Fight Club” until I happened to read spoilers for this movie. Now I’m really intrigued! Not sure if I’m intrigued enough to see gore on the big screen…but I think it’s interesting that they’ve made it part of this series.

    Like

    • Paul says:

      I couldn’t believe that they put “Fight Club” back on the big screen, (and couldn’t be happier). It has been one of my favorite films since its release and not because of the violence or perverse nature of the film, but because of the craft with which it was made. David Fincher is an underrated gem of a director.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s